Native Medicinal Plant Garden

Located 10 minutes north of downtown Lawrence, KS, the native medicinal plant garden showcases plants native to the Great Plains region, that have been used for medicine and other purposes. The gardens are part of the Kansas Biological Field Station. We are lucky to be partnered with the Douglas County Master Gardeners, whose expertise and hard work help maintain the gardens. Learn more about the gardens here.

The Native Medicinal Plant Garden is open year round from dawn to dusk. Map.

Photo Gallery

Illinois Bundleflower

Illinois Bundleflower

Desmanthus illinoensis

New England Aster

New England Aster

Symphotrichum nova-angliae

Pale Purple Coneflower

Pale Purple Coneflower

Echinacea pallida

White  Sage

White Sage

Artemisia ludoviciana

Winter Garden Scene

Winter Garden Scene

Blue Sage

Blue Sage

Salvia azure

Bee Balm

Bee Balm

Monarda fistulosa

Common Milkweed Pod

Common Milkweed Pod

Asclepias syriaca

Compass Plant

Compass Plant

Silphium laciniatum

Upright Prairie Coneflower

Upright Prairie Coneflower

Ratibida columnifera

Purple Coneflower

Purple Coneflower

Echinacea purpurea

Hungry Caterpillar

Hungry Caterpillar

Pharmacy Gardens

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Located on the south patio of the University of Kansas' School of Pharmacy, the Pharmacy Gardens are composed of 4 gardens highlighting the use of plants for medicine.

Tea and Scented Plants Garden

This garden demonstrated the connection between food and medicine, as the aromatic plants found here are used for both. Plants such as rosemary, mint, fennel, and lavender, not only flavor our food and drink, but are also used treat headaches, aid digestion, and relieve stress, among other uses.

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Lucius E. Sayre Garden

Lucius Sayre was KU's first dean of pharmacy. He was a champion of medicinal gardens planted at pharmacy schools to showcase the plants from which many medicines are derived. Through his efforts, the KU School of Pharmacy planted , what was then called a Drug Garden in the 1920's. To honor Lucius Sayre, in 2011, re created the Pharmacy garden planting many species found in that 1920's garden. Learn more about the Sayre garden here.

Echinacea Garden

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Purple coneflower (Echinacea sp.) is one of the most popular herbal medicines from the Great Plains. This garden bed showcase different species of Echinacea used for medicine. Learn more about our Echinacea research here

Native Great Plains Medicinal Garden

Along the outer edge of the patio, this garden highlights plants native to Kansas listed in the 1820 US Pharmacopeia.

 
 
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